Strongspage
Home Page
Home
About Me
My Family
Contact Me
Scotch Irish
William Augustus
Alonzo
Edward
Albert
Belle
McConoughey
Levi Strong
Levi Strong

This is the sad story of my great uncle, Levi Strong, a soldier who served as a private in the 9th Indiana Infantry Regiment during the Civil War. I have reconstructed the story based on letters that he wrote home to his father, Alonzo, and sister, Serena.  The letters were preserved by one of my cousins who transcribed and typed them.  By overlaying this data with historical data found on the internet and other sources, the events and locations he described can be verified and become more vivid. 

Levi was born in 1835 at his father’s farm in Berlin Center, Ohio, adjacent to the farm where I spent my youth.  He left home before 1860, and was living in Laporte, Indiana (U.S. census).  Why he left home or how he ended up in Indiana will remain a mystery, but from the site, Rail Road Maps of 1860, he probably took a train to Cleveland and then headed West toward Chicago.  Laporte appears to be near or on one of the available tracks. 

 

From his letters, it is clear that he was out of touch with his family for over two years, but finally wrote his father a letter after he had served in the army for about six months.  When living in Laporte, he wrote that life was not kind to him, as he was sick, but worked when he could and saved $75, probably from farm work. He then lost it because it was in bank notes from an Illinois bank that went broke.  He then took on a job clearing a wooded 10-acre plot, but became sick before he completed it, and had to pay someone else to finish the job.  As a result, he lost money on the contract.  At this low point in his life, he enlisted in the Army.

His enlistment was in the F Company, 9th Indiana Regiment, which was organized by Captain Carter.  The 9th Indiana was organized under Robert Milroy who later earned the rank of Brigadier General.  He entered service on 5 September 1961, the day the Regiment was formed as a three-year unit.  It had been organized for a three-month commitment a few days after Fort Sumter was attacked but then extended the arrangement.  Indiana was among the first states to send forces into the conflict

TypThe 9th Indiana was sent to Cheat Mountain which was part of Virginia, now West Virginia, and is near Morgantown.  Levi noted that he fought in one battle, probably Greenbrier River, on October 3, 1861.  The area was important as a back route to Richmond, and was especially important to the Union because the B & O Railroad passed through the area, carrying coal into Pittsburgh for the steel industry.  The 9th Indiana remained in the Cheat Mountain area for about a year with action at Greenbrier River, Grafton, an intersection of the B & O Railroad branches, and the Union’s Camp Baldwin.  There were skirmishes with the rebels at each of these locations, although Levi only mentioned being in one battle. 
 

The 9th Indiana  left Cheat Mountain in early January, 1962, for Louisville, Kentucky, and then made a difficult march to Nashville, Tennessee.  Levi became ill in Nashville and was left behind by the regiment.  He was in a Nashville hospital while the regiment continued on to Georgia where they participated in the Battle of Shiloh.  After a short stay in Nashville, Levi was then sent back home to Indiana to recuperate.  The first letter he wrote to his father was from Laporte on May 20, 1862.  Laporte is in northern Indiana, not far from Valparaiso.  His military record shows him at Salem Crossing, which is in Southern Indiana, just north of Louisville, so presumably he could obtain leave from the hospital to recuperate in Laporte.  Col. Milroy was from the Salem area.  Levi’s letter implied that he had been discharged and was planning to be well enough to earn some money that summer.   However, as shown by muster records, he was back with his unit in September, 1862, and there is no information as to how he spent the summer. 

 

His regiment was quite busy in the intervening period while Levi was recuperating in Indiana.  After Shiloh in April, they participated in the siege of Corinth, Mississippi in late April and the occupation of Corinth through May.  They pursued the rebels to Booneville in May and June, marched to Iuka Mississippi and then to Tuscumbia, Florence and Athens, Alabama through early July.  They were then ordered to Murfreesboro, Tennessee until late August, and then went to Louisville, Kentucky in pursuit of General Bragg’s army in August and September, 1862.

In early March, Levi discussed a skirmish at Woodbury Tennessee where he was involved with contact with some rebels on horseback.  Here is the description in his own words:

 
“We was out to Woodbury last Friday, a little town 8 miles from this place [Camp Readyville, Tennessee].  We had quite a nice little skirmish with the rebels, but they had to flee from their.  Myself and 6 others out of my company were about 400 yards in advance of the column in order to prevent a surprise.  As we was moving carelessly along all at once we saw about twenty rebels come around a bend in the road in front of us riding at full speed.  I

Csuppose they had saw us and not knowing thier was any more a coming thought they would make a shure thing or our little squad but as it happened their was an old house with in a few paces of us.  We succeeded in getting into that before they got close enough to shoot us and knocking out some of the chinking (as it was a log house) and leveling our old guns on them killing three of them and wounding two others among which was their leader a treatment that being rather discouraging they changed their notion and thought they would not attempt that squad of Yankees.  Turning their horses they rode off considerable faster than they came forward.  With all the bad things connected with war it was certainly laughable to see them Butternutts get away from there.  Dragging what game we had killed out of the road we proceeded on our march driving the rebs from town without much further trouble capturing twenty five prisoners and then retired to our camp.  I forgot to mention that we did not get a man hurt in the skirmish at the old house.  One ball passed through my cartridge box, and some one of the other boys getting holes through their clothing was all that happened to us.” 

Note from “Civil War Trust, Glossary of Civil War Terms”:


 
Levi’s letter in early March was a rant against regimental leadership, in particular Gen. Johnson.  Levi wrote that Johnson surrendered his regiment at Gatlinburg without firing a shot, but was then promoted to Brigadier General.  He then commanded a division at Murfreesboro.  At a time when an attack should have been expected, he had the artillery horses out to be watered and his men eating breakfast with their arms stacked.  All the artillery was captured without resistance, and the right wing of the battle line was driven back, causing the loss of hundreds of men.  The general was put under arrest, but Levi expected him to be give another promotion.  [Gen. Johnson did retain his rank and commanded a division at Chickamauga.  Levi probably fought in Johnson’s division.]

The battle involved in Levi’s rant was the Battle of Stone River or Murfreesboro.  The Confederate General Bragg was defeated at Perryville, Kentucky on October 8, 1862.  He then reorganized and renamed his army the Army of Tennessee and moved to Murfreesboro, Tennessee with the intent to establish winter quarters.  The Army of the Cumberland under General Rosecrans, followed Bragg, occupied Nashville and then located Bragg’s camp on 29 December, 1862.  Before Rosecrans could attack, Bragg, although outnumbered, attacked with the bulk of his forces on the Union’s right flank under Alexander McCook.  Rosecrans had allowed his attacking wing under Gen. Crittenden to eat breakfast before the attack, giving Bragg the chance to attack first.  However, Gen. McCook, who was in charge of the right wing even though he had performed poorly at Perryville, was not prepared, although he had been warned to expect an attack.  From the book Henry M. Cist in The Army of the Cumberland, chapter 8:

“Every soldier on that field knew when the sun went down on the 30th (December 1862) that on the following day he would be engaged in a struggle unto death, and the air was full of tokens that one of the most desperate of battles was to be fought.  In the face of all this, Johnson, the commander of the First Division on the right, was not on the line nor near enough to his troops to giver orders to them, his headquarters being a mile and a half in the rear.  General Willich the commander of the Second Brigade, which had been posted for the express purpose of protecting the extreme right of our army, was absent from his command at division headquarters.  His brigade was not even in line, as they had been ordered to get their breakfast.  The batteries of the division were not properly posted and in some cases the horses were away from the guns to the rear for water.  All this was criminal negligence – a failure in the performance of duty – for which some one should have suffered.  To the faulty position of the line and the unprepared condition of the troops is to be attributed the almost overwhelming disaster that overtook our army on that day.”

 

As the situation unfolded, Johnson’s division was the first to be attacked and they scattered.  Then a second division under General Davis fell apart.  Rosecrans was on the left flank attempting to manage his planned attack because he did not fully trust General Crittenden who was commanding the Union’s attacking forces.  General McCook failed to keep Rosecrans informed about the breach, an error similar to his fault at Perryville. 

Rosecrans considered retreating but then decided they could not retreat.  With some heavy fighting and a fierce Confederate attack, the Union held its ground.  Then on January 3, 1863 Bragg learned that Rosecrans army was larger than he had thought and as a result, retreated.  Rosecrans stayed in Murfreesboro for another six months to rebuild his army.  Levi was in camp at Readyville, just outside Murfreesboro during this period. 

Levi’s rant can be considered warranted as his complaint was that at the troop level, they received punishment for small offenses while their generals went unpunished even if their performance approached criminal negligence.  The battle which should have been a clear victory for the union, ended up with losses of 23,515 men (US lost 13,249men; CS lost 10,266 men).  Leadership failures allowed the Union lines to be breached resulting in a near loss to a weaker Confederate army.  Levi expressed his opinion that possibly represented the opinions at the troop level, that if Lincoln would round up and hang the rascals, the war would be over in short order. 

Alonzo, Levi’s father, had implied that the use of black soldiers would have a large impact on the war.  Levi did not agree, but expressed the view that if they killed a black soldier, the slaveholders would be out $500, while killing a white rebel, they would be out nothing.  He also wrote that that the Rebels black soldiers outnumbered those in the Union, and they would fight as well for one side as the other.

In March 1963, Levi wrote about nearly being captured.  Earlier in the day their Cavalry unit scouted the area for nearby Rebels.  That morning they found some rebels who were close to the camp pickets and lost 10 men in the resulting skirmish.  The assumption was that the Rebels would be making an attack on Readyville soon, if not on that day, and they were preparing to meet the challenge.  Levi was assigned as a sentinel about 160 feet (10 rods by Levi’s letter) from a main post.  Some rebels attempted to take a position between him and the post to cut him off, but he saw them before they were successful.  Levi wrote that he shot at them but did not hit anyone.  He notes that if he had not seen them when he did, he likely would have been on his way to Vicksburg as a prisoner. 

Levi frequently requested that his family send him stamps.  In one of his letters, he enclosed a dollar for stamps and later reminded his father that he had not received them.  The inability to buy stamps was a problem for the common soldier.


In May, Levi complained about boredom, suggesting that if they could have another fight the time would pass more rapidly.  He noted that General Rosecrans should be ready to move soon as his Army was as ready as it ever would be.  He wrote that he visited Murfreesboro a couple of weeks before and thought the camp looked great.  All the wagons, cannons and ambulances were painted so they looked new.  In his view, if Johnson (Confederate general) decided to take on Murfreesboro, he would have a tough time.  He also wrote that he had sent $50 to his father for safekeeping, but the man carrying it had been captured.  As a result, Levi was out $50 with nothing to show for it.

In an attachment of the same letter addressed to Serena, Levi noted that he found some men from Deerfield and Berlin Center, Ohio who were in the 105th Ohio Regiment.  He was able to meet this group, which included, Sam Weldy, William Middleton, Asher Kirkbride, and Zimri Engle, all commanded by Lt. Calvin Hartzell.  These were familiar family names to anyone who lived in Deerfield.  He noted that they generally liked the leadership of Calvin Hartzell.  Levi and Calvin Hartzell were cousins.

In June, Levi was still at Camp Readyville.  He noted that the soldiers had moved their camp a short distance for health reasons.  He again visited Murfreesboro and wrote that they had built 8 miles of fortification.  He mentioned their cavalry had picked up six “Butternuts” that morning about 6 miles from their camp. 

He wrote about local farmers who were harvesting wheat, but had little manpower so they hired some soldiers to help.  The soldiers made a deal that they would help after they were given a nice meal.  After the meal they disappeared without providing the help they promised.  This was the era before McCormick built machines to cut wheat.  Wheat was cut with a scythe, tied into sheaves and then was thrashed by hand for the wheat.  The process was very manpower intensive.  McCormick Reapers were invented in 1831, but Levi did not mention them.  It is likely that the area depended on slave labor which was cheaper than mechanized machinery such as horse drawn-reapers.

 

By early July, Levi had moved to Manchester, Tennessee.  He reported a hard march on the first of July with only one and a half days of rations, with no more available for five days.  He complains that he was hunger enough to eat a dead rat if he could have found one.  On the fifth day they received one day’s rations with promise of more on the seventh but it did not happen.  They were told to march back to Manchester (17 miles) over a miserable road before there could get anything to eat.  However, at Manchester there was little to eat, although a train had come in.  The letter on the 12th indicated that they were still very hungry with short rations.

At about the same time, Levi wrote about a rumored truce that would stop fighting for six months.  He considered that an indication that their fighting was in vain and that the pending truce gave an edge to the Rebels. His rant included the idea that “there would be no country worth returning to when the war was over.”  It is not at all clear whether this was in response to a rumor or to an initiative attempting to call a temporary truce.  [I could not find information about such a proposal for a truce.]  Again he

complained about the poor leadership.  He describes an incident where a foraging team with 20 or 30 wagons and three companies of the 9th Indiana were sent out, resulting in all the wagons being captured.  So the brigade’s last wagons and teams of horses were gone.  He clearly puts the blame on the regiment officers who sent the wagons out without adequate support. 

In Manchester, Levi worked on a detachment to cut railroad ties, but again complained about the lack of rations.  He noted that his brigade were to cut between 4,000 and 5,000 rail road ties but had stopped work until they obtained something to eat.  He also noted that he preferred to work at cutting ties to the camp routine of shining breastplates and shoes, drill, and standing guard for no reason.

 



Beginning in the 1830s Southern railroad companies acquired large numbers of slaves to be employed building rail roads.  The Union was able to make use of these skilled men to build and repair railroads that were needed for logistics support for its sweep through the South.  One would assume that these men were paid wages and were not kept as slaves.  However, it is interesting that troops were used to cut rails in support of these rail building operations. 

 



In this letter of July 27, 1863, Levi noted with pleasure that John Morgan had been stopped.  He was referring to Gen. John Morgan who raised the 2nd Calvary unit in Kentucky to become a Confederate Colonel on April 4, 1862, and was promoted to a Brigadier General in December 1862.  His unit fought at Shiloh in April, 1862. In July.  Then he made a sweep through Kentucky harassing Union forces, winning a great deal of publicity, while capturing about 1,200 Union soldiers and hundreds of horses.  Against General Bragg’s orders, he crossed the Ohio river raiding towns and infrastructure in Indiana and Ohio.  In July, 1863, he attempted to cross back over the Ohio River at Buffington Island to return to Virginia (now West Virginia), but was met with Union forces who blocked the crossing.  Union forces captured 700 of his men although 200 of his men did reach safety.  With his remaining force, Morgan continued his raids in Ohio, reaching Salineville, Columbiana County, on July 26, 1863 where he was captured.   Salineville is only about 30 miles from the Strong farm in Berlin Center which elevated Levi’s concern and interest. 

complained about the poor leadership.  He describes an incident where a foraging team with 20 or 30 wagons and three companies of the 9th Indiana were sent out, resulting in all the wagons being captured.  So the brigade’s last wagons and teams of horses were gone.  He clearly puts the blame on the regiment officers who sent the wagons out without adequate support. 

In Manchester, Levi worked on a detachment to cut railroad ties, but again complained about the lack of rations.  He noted that his brigade were to cut between 4,000 and 5,000 rail road ties but had stopped work until they obtained something to eat.  He also noted that he preferred to work at cutting ties to the camp routine of shining breastplates and shoes, drill, and standing guard for no reason.

 
Beginning in the 1830s Southern railroad companies acquired large numbers of slaves to be employed building rail roads.  The Union was able to make use of these skilled men to build and repair railroads that were needed for logistics support for its sweep through the South.  One would assume that these men were paid wages and were not kept as slaves.  However, it is interesting that troops were used to cut rails in support of these rail building operations. 
 

In this letter of July 27, 1863, Levi noted with pleasure that John Morgan had been stopped.  He was referring to Gen. John Morgan who raised the 2nd Calvary unit in Kentucky to become a Confederate Colonel on April 4, 1862, and was promoted to a Brigadier General in December 1862.  His unit fought at Shiloh in April, 1862. In July.  Then he made a sweep through Kentucky harassing Union forces, winning a great deal of publicity, while capturing about 1,200 Union soldiers and hundreds of horses.  Against General Bragg’s orders, he crossed the Ohio river raiding towns and infrastructure in Indiana and Ohio.  In July, 1863, he attempted to cross back over the Ohio River at Buffington Island to return to Virginia (now West Virginia), but was met with Union forces who blocked the crossing.  Union forces captured 700 of his men although 200 of his men did reach safety.  With his remaining force, Morgan continued his raids in Ohio, reaching Salineville, Columbiana County, on July 26, 1863 where he was captured.   Salineville is only about 30 miles from the Strong farm in Berlin Center which elevated Levi’s concern and interest. 
  

Levi’s next letter was very short and was sent from Camp Libby in Richmond.  He was undoubtedly among the prisoners transferred to Richmond as described by Brig. General Harrison Hobart, who related the events following the Battle of Chickamauga in a paper published after the war.  Gen. Hobart was captured on the second day and was the ranking officer captured.  He related that about 1,500 prisoners of war camped by a spring, most without blankets or overcoats and with no provisions at all.  On the September, 23, they were marched 30 miles to Tunnel Hill where they received their first rations. 

On the march they had received food from a field of green sorghum.  From there they were put in boxcars and were taken to Atlanta where they marched to an open field outside the city.  Kind-hearted people came out of the city to bring bread to throw across the guard line, but then additional guards came to prevent it.  The prisoners were held in an old slave quarters that night, and in the morning were marched to a railroad station for transportation to Richmond.  When they marched through Atlanta, they loudly sang the Star Spangled Banner. They arrived at Richmond on the 29th or 30th of September.

Mention of the “Star Spangled Banner” was surprising, as it did not become the National Anthem until 1933.  While it was written in the Baltimore harbor late in the War of 1812, we normally do

not think of it as a Civil War song but it became popular as an anthem for the Union forces, and was even translated into German in the hopes of recruiting German soldiers.  Oliver Wendel Holmes wrote the following fifth verse in 1861 in protest of the war:

 

Figure 14:  The Star Spangled Banner, Arrangement from 1861, Wikipedia

“When our land is illumined with Liberty's smile,
If a foe from within strike a blow at her glory,
Down, down with the traitor that dares to defile
The flag of her stars and the page of her story!
By the millions unchained who our birthright have gained,
We will keep her bright blazon forever unstained!
And the Star-Spangled Banner in triumph shall wave
While the land of the free is the home of the brave.”

[Wikipedia: “Star Spangled Banner”]

Gen. Hobart described Libby Camp in detail. 

Camp Libby was primarily a prison camp for holding Union officers, with enlisted men held at Belle Island.  It is not clear why Levi was there, although presumably Belle Island was over populated at the time. 

 

 

Camp Libby was a large food warehouse in Richmond, along the James River which was converted into a prison.  Prisoners were crowded into large rooms with little provision for sanitation.  No prisoners were held on the first floor but the basement held some areas for problem prisoners.  The rations provided were cooked by prisoners.  Disease and illness were serious issues and mortality was high. 

An article in the Daily Richmond Enquirer vividly described prison conditions in 1864 [From Wikipedia]:

 

"Libby takes in the captured Federals by scores, but lets none out; they are huddled up and jammed into every nook and corner; at the bathing troughs, around the cooking stoves, everywhere there is a wrangling, jostling crowd; at night the floor of every room they occupy in the building is covered, every square inch of it, by uneasy slumberers, lying side by side, and heel to head, as tightly packed as if the prison were a huge, improbable box of nocturnal sardines.”

Early in the war, prisoner exchanges were fairly common with release of equal men on each side.  The men were permitted to return to their units.  Any extra men released were obligated to be paroled and were not allowed to return to their military units.  After 1862, the situation became more complex as Lincoln released the draft “Emancipation Declaration”, requiring that black soldiers would be released with the same rules as white soldiers, and later, that black prisoners were to be treated the same as white prisoners.  The South responded that black prisoners would not be released, and in fact, held some Union black soldiers while white soldiers were released.  After more complications and negotiations, prisoner exchanges slowed, and finally in August 1863, President Lincoln signed an order that stopped all exchanges.  Failure of the prisoner-exchange programs caused serious crowding in both north and south prisons. 

Beginning on March 4, 1864, six hundred prisoners were shipped from Camp Libby to Americus, Georgia, to be held at what became Andersonville, with another 600 to be leave every other day with the intention of relocating all Libby prisoners. 

From the Richmond Sentinel dated March 4, 1864:

“Mr.Turner ships off this morning six hundred of his boarders to Americus, Ga.  We do not believe the Major regrets their departure much…certainly the citizens of this city do not.”

[ttp://mdgorman.com/Written_Accounts/Sentinel/1864/richmond_sentinel_341864a.htm ]

And from the Richmond Whig, 3/4/1864, p. 1, c. 4

 

“SENT SOUTH. - Six hundred of the Yankee prisoners at the Libby will be sent to Americus, Georgia, this morning. Hereafter, on each alternate day, the same number will be sent South.” [http://mdgorman.com/Written_Accounts/Whig/1864/richmond_whig,_3_4_1864.htm]

By May 30, he was at Andersonville and wrote his last letter home.  He apparently referred to a letter from his sister Serena, and noted that if she had sent boxes to him, he did not receive them.  He then stated that there were many boxes coming to the prisoners and that he would like to have one, but will leave it to the family whether to send one or not.  Boxes with food and clothing were received sporadically in the prison according to the accounts of surviving prisoners and the food was important to supplement the meager rations, mostly of corn meal.

 

 

Louvisa, Levi’s younger half-sister, recalled that they had sent numerous boxes of fruit to him, but never learned whether he received them or not. 

Levi was admitted to the hospital at Andersonville on August 6, 1864, and died 25 August 1864 of dysentery.  More than 45,000 Union soldiers were confined at Andersonville.  Of those, almost 13,000 died from diseases, poor sanitation, malnutrition, overcrowding, or exposure to the elements. 

 

 
A prisoner, Durance Atwater, worked as a clerk and documented the deaths of those who died.  He made a personal copy of the records with the intent of notifying relatives where their family members died.  After the war, Atwater and Clara Barton came to Andersonville to identify and mark the graves of those who were interred there.  With his list and the Confederate death records only 40 graves had to be marked as “unknown U.S. soldier.”  The prison site passed through several organizations until it ultimately became a national landmark, and the National Park Service took ownership in 1971.  The prisoner holding area has been restored, a small museum is maintained and the National Cemetery is well maintained.

 


Figure 18: Levi Strong's Grave, R. Strong

This story with minor modifications could be repeated for thousands of Union or Confederate soldiers who were raised on Midwest farms, served in the army, and died in similar circumstances.  The Strong family did remember Levi and for years wanted to bring his body home, but it is likely that he would have preferred to rest among the thousands at the National Cemetery.

 

 

Listing of References:

 

1

Levi Letter dated 5/20/1862

Ralph Strong’s Personal Collection

2

Levi Letter dated 3/9/1863

Ralph Strong’s Personal Collection

3

Levi Letter dated 3/9/1863

Ralph Strong’s Personal Collection

4

Levi Letter dated 3/26/1863

Ralph Strong’s Personal Collection

5

Levi Letter dated 4/19/1863

Ralph Strong’s Personal Collection

6

Levi Letter dated 5/13/1863

Ralph Strong’s Personal Collection

7

Levi Letter dated 6/15/1863, 

Ralph Strong’s Personal Collection

8

Levi Letter dated 7/12/1863

Ralph Strong’s Personal Collection

9

Levi Letter dated ??, 

Ralph Strong’s Personal Collection

10

Levi Letter dated 7/27/1863

Ralph Strong’s Personal Collection

11

Levi Letter dated 9/6/1863, 

Ralph Strong’s Personal Collection

12

Levi Letter dated 11/23/1863

Ralph Strong’s Personal Collection

13

Levi Letter dated 5/30/1864

Ralph Strong’s Personal Collection

14

Levi Letter dated 5/3/1864

Ralph Strong’s Personal Collection

15

9th regiment, Indiana Infantry

www.idtd.nps.gov

16

Wikipedia 9th Regiment Indiana Infantry

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9th_Indiana_Infantry_Regiment

17

9th Indiana Infantry Regiment History

www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/template.cfm?unitname9th%20Rement%2C%20Indiana%2

18

Family History

www.ancestor.com

19

National Archives Records 

Records in Ralph Strong’s personal collection

20

Ken Drew, Camp Sumter, The Pictorial View of Andersonville Prison

https://www.nps.gov/ande/learn/historyculture/camp_sumter_history htm

21

Roy Morris, Jr., Amborse Bierce

Alone In Bad Company, Crown

22

The Amborse Bierce Project

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambrose_Bierce

23

The Amborse Bierce Project

http://www.ambrosebierce.org/timeline2.html

24

Battle or Murfreesboro (Stone River)

http://www.aotc.net/Murfreesboro.htm

25

Brig. Gen Harrison Hobart Account

http://mdgorman.com/Prisons/Libby/Libby_Prison_The_Escape.htm

26

The Army of the Cumberland by Henry M. Cist

 

 




Home
About Me
My Family
Contact Me
Scotch Irish